Last Day of Classes at Andover

Physics Celebrates the Last Day of Classes with High-Flying Fun!

Carolyn Odden’s first and second period Physics classes spent some time after taking their AP tests to discover the aerodynamics of paper airplanes. Today, they had some healthy competition including: farthest flown forward (and backward), most aesthetically pleasing, and an accuracy test.

Winners of the day were Philip Lamkin ’17 for first period and Justin Williamson ’16 for second period.

Happy last day of classes, Andover, and good luck with your assessments!

Baby Geese!

Ornithology Returns to the Pond to Feed the Baby Geese

Guest Blog Post by Peyton McGovern ’16

Hello Readers!

Classes are winding down but the birds on campus certainly are not! Between the baby geese (one of these adorable babies can be seen in a photo courtesy of Angela Dolan ’16), baby Phoebe and the other bird nest at Stuart, campus is bustling with bird activity. It has been so exciting to watch my final term at Andover transition from the brisk end of winter to the sunshine and warmth of spring. Along with the changes in weather, so many birds have returned and filled campus with their lovely songs. It’s been so amazing to watch each week as new species return from their winter migration.

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As my class enters it’s final week together, we will most likely take one more field trip and study to prepare for our final exam. As an all senior Ornithology class, it feels especially bizarre to know we have such a short time left at the school. However, it’s great to spend one period per day studying birds, which is such an interesting and fun topic. Ornithology has been a great class for me this term specifically for three reasons: I have learned a lot about identifying local birds, gotten to engage a lot with my classmates on our field adventures and finally tried a unique course that I wouldn’t be able to take at many other high schools. So much bird watching to do with such little time left!

Ornithology Feeds Baby Geese at Andover Pond

Great Weather for the Ornithology Class Field Trip!

Guest Post by Peyton McGovern ’16

Hello Blog Readers,

This past week was an action packed adventure for those of us in Biology 421. During our double on Thursday, we took an off campus field trip to North Andover, where we searched for Herons. Unfortunately, we saw some nests but we did not see any Herons themselves. The landscape was a vast open swamp filled with many dead trees. The area looked seemingly eerie and desolate; however it was surprisingly filled with many red-winged Black birds and of course the Herons nests. After we spent some time on the dock overlooking the swamp, we drove to a nearby meadow, which was quite beautiful. We spotted some Bobolinks at the meadow, but it was a bit difficult for us because they were easily lost in the thick grass. Luckily, the weather was incredible which made this trip enjoyable for everyone. 

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Perhaps, my favorite part of the week came on Friday when our class fed the goslings at Rabbit pond. The baby geese were so adorable, tiny and fluffy. Mr. Cone brought us some bread to feed them, which they definitely enjoyed. We were surprised by the fact that the parents did not feed their young and often actually took the bread for themselves.

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Although the parent geese do not feed their babies at this stage, they are still extremely protective of their young. Whenever any of us or another adult geese got a bit too close, you could hear the parents hiss or see them change to a more aggressive position. Overall, it was a fantastic week in class and definitely our most interactive so far!

Spring is for the birds…

A Visit to the Bird Blinds to Prepare for Grandparent’s Weekend

A couple of times this term, Melanie Poulin and I were fortunate enough to accompany Mr. Tom Cone and Mr. Marc Koolen down to the Bird Blinds. For those of you who don’t know, a bird blind is an area where you can watch birds through slits in fence, so as not to frighten the birds away with your presence. This particular bird blind was made possible through the generous funding of the Abbot Academy Association in 2003.

The bird blinds are located off of Highland Road across the street from the 1929 House.You have to walk a bit down the beaten path, but it is well worth it. You come up to a large fence with benches on one side, but you cannot tell what is behind it until you get up close and look through the slots.

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When you look through the slots, you see that there is a pole system that holds lots of different bird feeders. There are lots of tree around and a little stream nearby that creates habitats for lots of different birds.

Every few days, someone will go down to fill the feeders so that the birds will keep coming back and give us something to view! Lots of birds will come to visit, just in time for Grandparent’s Weekend!

Along the way, we also saw a few nests with either baby birds in them or mother birds sitting on their eggs! We saw a little baby Phoebe bird sticking it’s head out of this nest:

A baby House Finch’s tail sticking out of this nest:

And a mother Robin sitting on her eggs in this nest:

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A Collection of Nests

Ornithology Begins to Wind Down With Oral Presentations and Bird Nest Viewing

Guest Post by Peyton McGovern ’16

Hi Blog Readers,

Our Bio 421 class is now in our oral presentation phase. This past Tuesday we had two sets of partners present their topics. The first group, Richie Ciufo ’16 and Ben Anthony ’16, showed the class their PowerPoint on Bird Vision. Their slides compared human vision to bird vision. It was quite remarkable to see how much better the birds eyesight was. Not only can birds follow things faster with their eyes, they also have the ability to see ultra violet light. Next came Livy Golini ’16 and Morgan Gramlich ’16, who presented on bird’s magnetism. The extent to which bird use magnetic fields is still widely debated and currently being researched. Tomorrow, my partner Olivia Lamarche ’16 and I will present on bird emotions. Similar to Richie and Ben, we will also compare bird and human emotions to see any similarities or differences.

On Friday, we took a break from oral presentations to observe the best collection that Mr. Cone set up for our class. We looked at over 20 nests and were tasked with identifying which material were used to create each nest. Certain nests were made out of pine needles and mud, whereas others may have contained feathers, leaves and sticks.

It was really unique to see such a variety of nests all in one place. I always assumed all nests were circular, which was not the case at all. Some were square and others did not have an explicit shape.

This week we will have presentations on Monday and Tuesday and most likely an outdoor adventure Thursday! I’m hoping to see the sun more this week than we encountered last week.

Mercury Transit – TODAY!

View Today’s Rare Celestial Sight from Outside Commons!

Students are gathered with Carolyn Odden, Physics Instructor, outside commons today to view the Mercury Transit today through a telescope with a special solar filter. Come view the rare event where Mercury crosses the sun from the Earth’s perspective. You can see Mercury as a tiny dot on the sun’s surface as it orbits. To view, you need special equipment with solar filters – please do not look directly into the sun.

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According to CBSNews.com:

“The transit of Mercury got underway just after 7 a.m. on the east coast with the smallest planet appearing as a tiny black dot on the face of the sun. The transit will last for a total of about 7.5 hours. The last time solar-planetary ballet happened was 2006. It will happen again three years from now, but then not until 2032.

Mercury transits occur just 13 times per century, on average. They’re so rare because the innermost planet’s orbit is inclined by about 7 degrees compared to that of Earth, so Mercury, the sun and our home planet just don’t line up all that often.”

Read the full CBSNews.com article HERE.

You can also watch live video with Astronomer commentary at SPACE.COM.

Bird Cams

Observe live birds with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Keeping with our Bird Posts this week, you can observe some of the birds Peyton spoke about in her posts live on camera!

A Pair of Red-Tailed Hawks live in Ithaca, NY with their three babies:

http://cams.allaboutbirds.org/channel/16/Red-tailed_Hawks/

Indiana’s Barred Owls and Owlets can be observed here:

http://cams.allaboutbirds.org/channel/43/Barred_Owls/

And a Great Horned Owl’s nest (currently empty – but maybe they will be back!):

http://cams.allaboutbirds.org/channel/46/Great_Horned_Owls/

Sparrows, Swifts, and Hummingbirds, OH MY!

Spring Brings More Birds to Campus

Guest Blog Post by Peyton McGovern ’16

Hello Ornithology Blog readers,

With the slightly warmer spring temperatures, my class has spotted a few more birds on campus that have begun to migrate back up north after their winter getaway including: Chipping Sparrows, Phoebes and Red Winged blackbirds. Mr. Koolen has heard a mockingbird on campus, which we have yet to see but hope to spot on our next field day, this Thursday. In the following weeks some other birds should also be returning to campus such as, Catbird, Baltimore Oriole, Chimney Swift, Hummingbirds and a bit later the Kingbird as well. In his trip down to North Carolina this past weekend, Mr. Cone spotted some Red eyed Vereos, which will also migrate up to Andover later in the season. According to Mr.Cone, the Vereos have one of the most boring calls of all birds, which makes it quite distinguishable.

As for my own bird observations, I traveled into Boston yesterday to watch the marathon, where I noticed many birds roaming about, especially on the Boston Common. Most popular by far was the pigeon but I also saw Chickadees as well. With the trees beginning to flower and more sunlight, I am sure the city will be overwhelmed with the bird songs soon.

We have 3 day week this week so unfortunately, my bird watching class will only meet two times this week but we will be able go outside for the double period. Our campus route starts on Rafferty field, goes along Hyland Road, passes by Moses Stuart House, goes through Pine Knoll and finally ends at Rabbit Pond. Rabbit pond offers us a great spot to view geese, and birds making nests nearby.