Welcome Back!

Another Year, Another Great Set of Blog Posts!

Welcome back to Andover! I am sure for a lot of you, it has been a great summer, but it is time to get back into the swing of things!

We have a lot of great things planned for you this year! Be sure to check out one (or more!) of our amazing Science classes this year!

If you are enjoying your Science class or have a Science-related independent project and would like to write one (or more!) blog post – let Ms. Andersen know at randersen@andover.edu! It can even count as your work duty… (!!!!!)

Have a great year!

Mornings with MAC – Faulk Edition

Get to Know Your Science Faculty with your Weekly Installment of Mornings with MAC!

GUEST POST BY MICHAEL CODRINGTON ’18

Mornings with MAC logoOn this week’s Mornings with MAC, we have former Andover student and Chemistry Department Chair, Mr. Faulk. Brian Faulk was Andover class of 2000, having shared parts of his Andover experience with many faculty including Natalie Wombwell ‘01 and Terrell Ivory ‘00.

Faulk taught my last term of Chemistry 250, and definitely offered a challenge. Gifting me the nickname MC3+, after one of the ions we worked with, it’s safe to say me and Mr. Faulk had a good relationship. I sat down with him during his morning coffee to ask him some questions.

FA 3075722 Faulk, BrianMC: What do you teach at Andover?
BF: Are you recording me?

MC: Yes I am – hahaha!
BF: I teach all levels of chemistry, primarily chem 250 and organic chemistry.

MC: How long have you been working at Andover?
BF: I’ve worked here for 10 years.

MC: What brought you here?
BF: As a student I was really inspired by my teachers not just my classroom teachers but my coaches and my academic advisor. I thought it’d be cool to come back and serve in those roles as a faculty member.

MC: Where did you go to college? What did you study?
BF: I went to Stanford to study chemistry and Harvard for grad school to study chemistry.

MC: What is your favorite thing about Andover?
BF: I think my favorite thing is the people – both students and faculty, it’s a really rich and vibrant community and that makes it fun to come to work everyday.

MC: If you weren’t studying/teaching chemistry, what other discipline would you be in?
BF: History. Probably history – I love history and I’d probably do something with the Civil War.

MC: What’s your favorite movie?
BF: What?

MC: What is your favorite movie?
BF: I really like Patton.

MC: Like the General?
BF: Yeah, they won an Academy Award. It was a great film.

MC: Do you consider yourself an easy or hard teacher?
BF: I’m sure the students would say I’m difficult. I have high expectations, but I always want to do what’s best for the students. I want to coach them along to learn as much as possible.

MC: What’s one thing that a lot of people don’t know about you?Snapchat-1945347321
BF: I think it’s probably that I love history, and it’s my passion. Sometimes I wish I was a history teacher. I read a lot of history magazines in my free time.

MC: I understand you went to Andover. How was that experience and who was your favorite teacher from when you were a student?
BF: It was tough at times, but I certainly learned a lot, how to work and manage my time, how to ask for help. It prepared me everything after. I think my favorite teacher was Henningsen, recently retired. He was just really good and brilliant. A great historian and a great teacher.

Astronaut Mae Jemison Visits Andover

The first African-American woman to travel to space speaks to the Andover Community

Guest Post by Isabelle Bicks ’18

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Last Friday evening, Andover had the privilege to welcome Dr. Mae Jemison, first African-American woman to travel to space, accomplished physician, and lifelong dancer. Her vast knowledge and passion for science were palpable, but I was most interested by the connection Dr. Jemison made between the arts and sciences. As both a ballet dancer and biology student, I loved that she drew from both seemingly opposite experiences to illustrate how she was a pioneer in her career. Dancing has been such an integral part in my own life and has most certainly impacted how I work as a student at Andover. Dr. Jemison explained that the arts are the study of ourselves, while science is the study of the world around us. I had never before realized this connection. Although our world today tends to compartmentalize people and label them as either gifted math/science people or arts and humanities people, Dr. Jemison completely disrupted this tendency and explained how her own passion for the arts translated into the successful career she leads.  I think that these ideas about integrating arts and sciences can be utilized at Andover. Bridging the curriculum between the two disciplines seems necessary and beneficial.  At a school that strives to achieve “empathy and balance,” Dr. Jemison was the perfect speaker to embody these qualities.

The Science Faculty had an opportunity to attend a reception with Ms. Jemison and here is a bonus photo of her with Carol Artacho (physics), Sheena Hilton (chemistry), Caroline Odden (physics), and Fei Yao (physics).

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Blue Moon

An introduction to Andover’s new STEM-based Magazine

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The Phillips Academy students have published a new STEM Magazine – Blue Moon – a magazine of student-written research papers and articles.

Blue Moon was created as a platform for STEM research, as a means by which students can exercise the final step of the scientific method: communication. It aims to foster curiosity and cooperation in both its writers and its readers. Bi-annual print publications are made possible by a grant from the Abbot Academy Association, continuing Abbot’s tradition of boldness, innovation, and caring. Issue I of Blue Moon spotlights the diversity of student interest within the sciences, topics ranging from immunotherapy to gender discrimination to prosthetics. (*from the inside cover of Issue I)

We spoke with Amanda Li, ’18 who pioneered this project, which has been about two years in the making, thus far. During her freshman spring, she began to look for a place on campus to share a paper she had written. When she could not find an outlet on campus, she began to formulate the idea of a student scientific publication. 

“Seeing as there wasn’t any such thing yet, I reached out to students from different grades and backgrounds to see if they were interested in a STEM journal. The overwhelming response was yes, so I decided to take some action and hopefully allow other students to share their research and ideas. It also allows new students to start exploring various STEM areas, by allowing them to read about the interests that their peers hold.” -Amanda Li, ’18

img_6869She applied for an Abbot Grant in her lower fall to fund the publication of bi-annual issues. She received full funding and got to work! She gathered editors, graphic designers, and potential writers during her lower spring and summer. They officially started Blue Moon last fall and they have received over 30 articles so far!

“I’m really grateful for the AAA’s support, otherwise I doubt this would be possible. I’m looking forward to start the process of making the next issue!”  -Amanda Li, ’18

If you are interested in learning more or reading the many articles submitted, visit bluemoonjournal.com. They are always looking for submissions and feedback!

Chemistry Visits Addison Art Gallery

Chem 200 Visits the Addison Art Gallery to Learn About the Chemical History of Photography

Guest Post by Sofie Brown ’18

Our Chem 200 class was a little bit surprised when Mr. Robinson told us that we would be taking a class field trip to campus’ Addison Gallery of American Art. Chemistry is usually not something associated with art museums but Chem 200 was there to take the sometimes abstract and hard to understand equations and formulas and apply them to photography.

Before the trip, the class divided up into pairs to research the different types and chemical processes involved the history of the creation of photographs. We researched the Daguerreotype, Tin type, Ambrotype, Albumen Prints, and Gelatin Silver Prints. All of these photograph types uses a different chemical process to create the image and by looking at the chemical processes involved in the creation we could trace the history of photographs.

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By looking at rare old photographs and sharing our research we discussed how chemical advances have made photography more accessible which has significantly altered the country’s memory and way of looking at history. Photography made memory visual and became the most democratic way of capturing the stories of all people, not just those who could afford to have their portraits painted. Chemical advances took photography from using large equipment in many steps with many poisonous chemicals to print a fragile easily faded photo to a small two step process on paper that is durable and cheap. Photographers would take large wagons of equipment and glass around with them to Civil War battlefields in order to photograph soldiers and the fields of dead when photography first came to prominence. Soldiers also often had Daguerreotypes taken (the classic framed black and white head shot). Gradually, Daguerreotypes evolved to be printed on tin and cheaper and more durable and then eventually became a two step process and printed on paper.

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The digital photographs we have today would not be possible without the chemical advances in photography over many, many years. Learning about the chemistry of photographs offered our class real world applications and implications of the molecules and elements we struggle to fit into formulas and categories in the classroom.