Bird Cams

Observe live birds with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology

Keeping with our Bird Posts this week, you can observe some of the birds Peyton spoke about in her posts live on camera!

A Pair of Red-Tailed Hawks live in Ithaca, NY with their three babies:

http://cams.allaboutbirds.org/channel/16/Red-tailed_Hawks/

Indiana’s Barred Owls and Owlets can be observed here:

http://cams.allaboutbirds.org/channel/43/Barred_Owls/

And a Great Horned Owl’s nest (currently empty – but maybe they will be back!):

http://cams.allaboutbirds.org/channel/46/Great_Horned_Owls/

Birds of Prey Visit Andover

The Ornithology Classes Get a Visit from Wingmasters, a Bird Education and Rescue Program

Guest Post by Peyton McGovern ’16

Hello Blog Readers,

This week was super exciting for Bio 421! After 4 weeks of studying local and national birds, we had visitors from Wingmasters, a program that works to rehabilitate injured birds. It was so fascinating to see the birds we have been learning about in class so close.

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For me personally, I was most captivated by the owls. Both the barred owl and horned owl were incredible but my favorite was the saw-whet owl. I never knew that owls could be of that miniature size.

Another incredible bird we observed was the Peregrine Falcon, the fastest animal in the world. This bird can fly up to 200 miles per hour and spots its prey from the top of skyscrapers.

Aside from the fascination of this program, it was also quite educational. The woman who worked for Wingmasters, Julie, talked a lot about the environmental effects of pesticides and other chemicals on the health of birds. Throughout their time, Wingmasters has seen a decline in some species of birds because the birds prey, rodents and insects, often eat food that is sprayed by pesticides. The pesticides kill the insects and rodents and often has deadly effects for the birds as well. However, Julie and her partner, Jim, also mentioned many projects that attempt to revive dwindling bird populations. Overall, this was a super exciting and educational opportunity for our class.

Ms. Andersen put together the video below of some clips from the presentation:

Cherry Tree Cookie Day

Biology Faculty Tom Cone celebrates one of the natural beauties of the Phillips Academy Campus

One of Andover’s great traditions is when Tom Cone puts out cookies under the Cherry Tree between Sam Phil and Morse Hall to commemorate spring and to call attention to one of the natural treasures of the campus.

This morning was that morning. Mr. Cone’s first period Bio-100 class helped him prepare many trays of cookies to put out throughout the morning. They helped him bring the table and “Welcome Spring” sign out and, of course, helped themselves to the first bites of the goodies!

 

The entire class then gathered beneath the tree, where Mr. Cone used this as a learning opportunity as all the Bio-100 classes are learning about the anatomy of flowers and other plants. He pulled a couple of buds off the trees to demonstrate the pieces of a flower that they had learned about in class.

The cherry tree also has a rich history on the campus – it has been around for decades and was almost cut down – twice! The first time was in the early 1970’s, when the old Evans Hall Science Building still stood. Some in the school thought that the cherry tree blocked the view of the building from the west side of campus and planned to cut the tree down. Students and faculty heard this and many people literally “hugged” the tree the day the cutters came so they could not cut the tree down. They did not come back.

Later, after the Gelb Science Center was built in 2004, some in the school again thought that the tree blocked the view of the building from the Foxcroft area. Members of the PA community fought to keep the tree and when the architects of Gelb agreed with the community, the result was an agreement to keep the tree.

While this year, because of the recent warm, then cold, weather, the blooms are a bit sparse, it should come to full bloom in the next couple of days. Be sure to stop by some time this morning to marvel this magnificent tree (and get some cookies!) or make sure to notice it at some point in the next few days, before the bloom is over.

Below are photos taken of the Cherry Tree during a great bloom year!

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Happy Spring from the Division of Natural Sciences!

Evolutionary Lessons in Bio500

Students discover Darwin and his journey ’round-the-world

March 24, 2016

Starting off the spring term here at Andover, the Biology-500 students are learning about Darwin and evolution. To demonstrate and speak about Darwin’s journey around the world, Marc Koolen and Christine Marshall-Walker, Biology Instructors, used models of the HMS Beagle and Darwin’s workshop.

Students learned the conditions in which Darwin was selected to sail aboard the HMS Beagle where his scientific explorations eventually led to the publication of his theories on evolution. At the time, Darwin was trained to enter the clergy and did not have a degree in any type of science. Typically, the ‘naturalist’ aboard a British Naval Vessel was the ship’s doctor and also a naval officer – Darwin was neither. The ship’s captain, FitzRoy, eventually chose Darwin for his social standing, rather than his skills as a naturalist and so that there would be someone of equal stature with which to speak. Being a civilian, Darwin could speak freely with the captain without the worry of discipline.

The model above (crafted by Mr. Marc Koolen himself) shows, in detail, Darwin’s workshop aboard the HMS Beagle. The HMS Beagle had been modified to be a survey vessel whose mission was to map coastlines around the globe for British merchant ships to use.  “The ship was basically a jeep with sails…all work, no luxury. Darwin came from an extremely wealthy family and had lived a very pampered life…how he survived 5 years under such primitive conditions is truly amazing.” said Mr. Koolen during his lesson.

The lesson was super interesting! Although our typical lectures are far from boring, it was neat to use different mediums of education to supplement the material. Mr. Koolen’s model was an awesome tool to do this with! It really gave us historical context to support what we already learned about Darwin as well as a visual tool to help us really grasp the lesson. – Janet Conklin ’17

The students then went on to look at some preserved organisms, all of which launched a discussion about evolution and how evolution is evidenced in shared structures between extinct organisms and today’s organisms.

Spring has Sprung for BIO100!

Phillips Academy Biology-100 Courses Plant Seeds on the Gelb Lawn

March 25th, 2016

Today, as part of Andover’s Biology-100 course, a garden was started outside the Gelb Science Center.

Areas of soil were carved out of the grassy area next to Gelb in preparation for this experiment. The faculty brought each period of Biology-100 students out (in the rain!) to spread seed on their section of the plot. Periods One, Two, and Three planted “Meadow Mix” (a mix of different types of grass) in one plot and Periods Four, Five, Six, and Seven planted a Wildflower Mix in another plot.

Biology Instructor, Raj Mundra, explained to the first and second period classes that they were contributing to a bigger experiment going on throughout the Phillips Academy Campus. They are planting a mix of grasses that may not have to be mowed! A tuft of grass next to this plot will not be mowed as a control to this experiment to see how tall the new grass gets in comparison. The results of this experiment could lead to a new frontier of landscaping!

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After spreading the seeds over their part of the plot, the classes then walked over the seeds to make sure they were secure in the soil. The faculty explained that his drizzly day was the perfect day to plant these seeds because they will get water right away and begin the growth process.

But wait! There were four plots in the photos at the beginning of this post – what about the other two, you ask? These same Biology-100 students will be planting seeds of their choosing in these two plots. Stay tuned to find out what they plant and to keep updated on the progress of our “Gelb Garden”!