Last Day of Classes at Andover

Physics Celebrates the Last Day of Classes with High-Flying Fun!

Carolyn Odden’s first and second period Physics classes spent some time after taking their AP tests to discover the aerodynamics of paper airplanes. Today, they had some healthy competition including: farthest flown forward (and backward), most aesthetically pleasing, and an accuracy test.

Winners of the day were Philip Lamkin ’17 for first period and Justin Williamson ’16 for second period.

Happy last day of classes, Andover, and good luck with your assessments!

Mercury Transit – TODAY!

View Today’s Rare Celestial Sight from Outside Commons!

Students are gathered with Carolyn Odden, Physics Instructor, outside commons today to view the Mercury Transit today through a telescope with a special solar filter. Come view the rare event where Mercury crosses the sun from the Earth’s perspective. You can see Mercury as a tiny dot on the sun’s surface as it orbits. To view, you need special equipment with solar filters – please do not look directly into the sun.

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According to CBSNews.com:

“The transit of Mercury got underway just after 7 a.m. on the east coast with the smallest planet appearing as a tiny black dot on the face of the sun. The transit will last for a total of about 7.5 hours. The last time solar-planetary ballet happened was 2006. It will happen again three years from now, but then not until 2032.

Mercury transits occur just 13 times per century, on average. They’re so rare because the innermost planet’s orbit is inclined by about 7 degrees compared to that of Earth, so Mercury, the sun and our home planet just don’t line up all that often.”

Read the full CBSNews.com article HERE.

You can also watch live video with Astronomer commentary at SPACE.COM.

RWDC Club Travels to Maryland for National Competition

Andover Earns 2nd Place in Real World Design Challenge National Competition

This past weekend, Andover’s Real World Design Challenge Club travelled to Chevy Chase, Maryland to participate in a National Competition. This AMAZING accomplishment was the result of a year-long endeavor that culminating in winning the state championships in February – beating out Marlboro High and Weymouth Public for first place. Winners of the State Championships are then invited to the National Competition.

Roshan Benefo ’16, Kunal Vaishnavi ’18, Vishvesh Dhar ’19, and Alex El Adl ’19 traveled to the 4-H center in Chevy Chase MD with Clyfe Beckwith, Physics Instructor, this Friday-Sunday.  Jocelyn Shen ’18 and Darcy Meyer’18 could not attend because of conflicts with Robotics Competition travel; Jocelyn and Darcy were acknowledged in the presentations this weekend for having done a major portion of the work leading up to the team’s success.

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The challenge for the national competition was to design (not build) an UAV (Unmanned Aircraft System) using industry leading-edge computer software (CREO), to plan a task of scanning a field for the moisture content (advising a farmer on too little or too much water for crops) by selecting appropriate cameras or detection devices mounted on the UAV, and to come up with a competitive 5-year business plan.

On Saturday April 23rd, after the first round morning presentations, team MA (Big Blue) was selected as one of the three finalists along with teams CT (Xavier Engineers) and AZ (Red Mountain Engineering) edging out the state champs from: Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, Illinois, North Carolina, Texas, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Arkansas, Nevada, Pennsylvania, California, and Virginia.

In the evening presentations, the three finalists were judged by approximately a dozen industry leading engineers/academicians (ex. Bell Helicopter Labs, Aeronautics colleges).  Team Big Blue earned a second place in this national competition, team CT taking first place.  Winners were awarded a trophy as well as a $50,000 scholarship to Embry-Riddle (each). [Four teams from China competed in their own national competition and presented separately on Saturday alongside the US competition in MD.]

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Congratulations to team Big Blue on such an AMAZING accomplishment!

To learn more about the challenge check out http://realworlddesignchallenge.org/.

Jane Goodall Visits Andover

Dr. Jane Goodall, beloved researcher and conservationist, visited Andover on Friday, April 8th to give an inspiring talk about protecting our natural world.

My Bio 100 students attended the lecture and wrote reflective responses. They were inspired, even transfixed and calling the presentation “magical,” commenting on Jane Goodall as a person and a mind. They remarked on her determination to follow her childhood dreams in spite of lack of resources, her empathy with animals and connection to nature, her rejection of authority and stodgy scientific biases and conventions, her passionate and tireless work, her humanity, and her invocation of a global community made up of responsible beings concerned with common good. As the students’ teacher I felt pretty inspired by not just Goodall but by these students. I also feel determined to spend more time outside in Bio 100! ~ Anna Milkowski, Biology Instructor

This talk meant a lot to Tom Cone, Biology Instructor and part of the Campus Beautification Committee, who has fought to protect so many things in “our” natural world – including the Cherry Tree between Morse and Sam Phil.

Below is a recording of her full presentation.

UMass Senior Helps Discover New Galaxies

Astronomy News in The Boston Globe

March 30, 2016

Today, an article in the Boston Globe features a senior who attends the University of Massachusetts Amherst and how he helped discover some of the brightest galaxies in the universe.sky-space-galaxy-milky-way

Kevin Harrington was among the team who’s groundbreaking research was published in a prestigious European astronomy journal this month, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. He made this discovery first by sifting through mountains of publicly available data and drawing his own conclusions and theories about said data. He was the lead author of a paper outlining the findings published in the above publication.

Harrington is 23 years old and discovered his love of astronomy in high school – he will be graduating UMass this spring and heading to start his doctoral work in September.

In response to this article, Clyfe Beckwith, Phillips Academy Physics Instructor gives “a shout-out for public institutions and to someone who is tenacious enough to sift through someone else’s (public) data.”

The article, “UMass senior helps find universe’s brightest galaxies, by Nestor Ramos, was featured on the front page of the Boston Globe on Wednesday, March 30th, 2016.