The A-MAZE-ing Chicks…

Take On The Labyrinths of Room 103!

GUEST POST BY EMMA BROWN ’19

After a successful relay race last Monday— though some chicks were a tad distractible— Animal Behavior students have spent the past week studying associative learning and spatial cognition. This was achieved through two experiments: teaching our chicks to turn in a circle on command, and determining their learning abilities in the context of navigating a simple Y-maze.

Pictured below is Jan’s chick, Colonel Sanders, who was the only triumphant twirler in our class.

For the second experiment, my group constructed a Y-maze out of shoeboxes wherein one path from the fork would lead to food and freedom, and the other to a dead end. We tested the accuracy of Ferdi, Colonel Sanders, and a third chick over the course of five runs.

Our data depicted a significant decrease in time taken from Run 1 to Run 2 immediately followed by an outlier increase for all three birds in Run 3. Then, as the timing decreased for all birds aside from Ferdinand (who got distracted) in Runs 4 and 5 respectively, the data appeared to indicate that chicks can retain their learning of a Y-maze for a short amount of time, needing to “re-learn” the route before gaining any form of proficiency.

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Author: pascienceblog

Administrative Assistant, Division of Natural Sciences

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